Thursday, June 22, 2017

Looking back at Spring (part 2)

Ed Gaillard: birds &emdash; Worm-Eating Warbler, Central Park

Another bird I got a better-than-usual look at this Spring was Worm-Eating Warbler. Usually they're hard to find in Central Park in the Spring, but this year there were several good sightings, mostly along the south short of Turtle Pond.

Ed Gaillard: birds &emdash; Worm-Eating Warbler, Central Park

Worm-Eating Warblers are more frequent in the park in Fall, when they tend to creep through the dead leaves on the ground in shady spots. They are pretty cryptic in that setting. These Spring migrants, though, liked the catkins in the oaks, pretty high off the ground but sometimes coming down almost to eye level. The oaks at Turtle Pond are set well back from the fenced path, but it was still a pretty good view.

Ed Gaillard: birds &emdash; Worm-Eating Warbler, Central Park

because of the distance and light, these photos didn't come out quite as well as I had hoped, but it was still quite a nice view of the bird.

Monday, June 19, 2017

Looking back at Spring (part 1)

Ed Gaillard: birds &emdash; Bay-Breasted Warbler, Central Park

So how have you all been? Had a good Spring migration? Mine was good, but I didn't have my act together to post about it. Too many photos, too little time. I really need to come up with a better workflow. And now Summer is beginning, and the migration has passed, and it'll be another year before I get to do it again.

Anyway, it was a pretty good migration season. There were a lot of birds, although some of the "normal rarities" didn't show up much--I don't think anyone had a Prothonotary or Cerulean Warbler, for example, not in Central Park, maybe not anywhere in Manhattan.

Ed Gaillard: birds &emdash; Bay-Breasted Warbler, Central Park

I never ran into a real "magic tree", but I did have a nice long encounter with a Bay-Breasted Warbler, right where the Belvedere Caste plaza ends and the steps down to the Ramble start.

Ed Gaillard: birds &emdash; Bay-Breasted Warbler, Central Park

He foraged in one tree for a good half-hour, frequently at eye-level, and in really good light. I was amazed how his cap glowed in the sunlight.

Ed Gaillard: birds &emdash; Bay-Breasted Warbler, Central Park